My name is Lauren Buckley.
I'm the daughter of the daughter of a farmer's daughter. I was raised in Wisconsin. Educated in Minnesota. I seem to be on a never ending tour of the Midwest via clients and companies. Opinionated since 1983. Sarcastic since somewhere around there.


These are my diggings into the registry of design, op-ed, digital and diction related pieces that pique my imagination.


Photo

Jul 31, 2014
@ 9:48 am
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Sometimes you just have to go gold overboard. Am I right?

Sometimes you just have to go gold overboard. Am I right?


Photo

Jul 31, 2014
@ 9:44 am
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When Mad Men was real.

When Mad Men was real.


Photo

Jul 29, 2014
@ 11:04 pm
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This is one of my favorite things #stitchfix

This is one of my favorite things #stitchfix


Text

Jul 29, 2014
@ 10:31 am
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southern style two generations removed…

I had the pleasure of attending the Polaris Industries sales meeting over the past two days. It was a lot of techs and specs talk and reveals of amazing new vehicles, but what I couldn’t help but notice was the Southern women walking around the Minneapolis Convention Center.

From the hair to the accessories and the dresses to the bling, women who are born, grow up or assimilate in the South sure know how to put themselves together. It isn’t about perfect but it is about proper. You don’t wear open toed shoes unless your toes are in the condition to be seen. If you can carry a bag, why not carry one that grabs some attention. If you a dress with stripes, your shoes shoe have stripes too. Diamonds and dresses mixed with perfectly executed dye jobs and I am sure a few diets - these women were a thing to behold.

I remember my first trip “down south” to Atlanta, Georgia and you know, even back then I was smitten. There is something so unapologetically feminine about them. I am not sure if they rail agains the glass ceiling, gender pay gap, feminist ideology that fills my news feeds, but my impression is that even if they do, they don’t give up their girliness to do it. Of course that accent doesn’t hurt either. I know we talk about the charm of a Southern gentleman and his slow, dripping drawl, but on the ladies it is just as disarming. It sounds innocent but with a cracking whip.

My grandmother grew up in Virginia and while we can argue the semantics of whether or not she is “Southern”, I think her upbringing had a distinct and lasting effect on how I dress. Not to toot my own horn here, but a lot of people ask me where I shop or how I choose to put myself together?  With a robot-like response I have given credit to my mother for instilling certain values about dress, style and general presentation. Not that she doesn’t deserve credit, because God knows there are outfits I tried to get away with wearing and she wasn’t having it under her roof.

But, I feel as though I owe a lot to my mother’s mother. Marie, with her cork boards filled with 3,000 earrings ranging from golf clubs and balls to costume jewelry that would have made Marilyn blush. Her collection of rings, and shoes in every possible shade. The way she wore her prematurely white hair to accentuate her petite frame against skin always kissed by the sun. Her mannerisms. Her hint of a drawl and of course those great colloquialisms. Her unapologetic nature that is always followed with a “bless his/her heart.” Her style goes beyond fabrics and fashion, it is the very way she carries herself. I don’t think I have ever seen my grandmother look like she is letting herself go, frumpy or any of the other words often associated with women in their golden years. Heck, she even made us call her grandmother because grandma seemed too matronly and “old”.  

So here is to you, Marie Potterton. I owe my matching belt and shoes requirement, my accessories are a must mantra, my don’t be afraid of a bright shade of lipstick attitude and my “if you can wear shoes, why wouldn’t you wear heels?” ideals to you. Oh, and who can forget the sass and spitfire. I got a little bit of that from you too.

So thanks for giving me a little bit of Southern style. It made me happy yesterday and this morning I put on red lipstick and red heels because that is how we roll.


Link

Jul 28, 2014
@ 4:36 pm
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Invest Generously Advertising Professionals. Generously. »


Photoset

Jun 15, 2014
@ 4:00 am
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5,507 notes

nevver:

Don’t wreck my flow, Edward Burtynsky


Quote

Jun 14, 2014
@ 8:00 pm
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255 notes

His status as public jester, good-timing party-crasher, and Waldo-like impresario surely tells us things about Web culture, contemporary celebrity, and the ways in which people prefer their famous people to be both generous and too cool to care. Will we ever grow tired of these Murray moments? Is there such a thing as Peak Bill Murray, and then the backlash?

Ian Crouch on Bill Murray, Internet jester: http://nyr.kr/1om3ziZ (via newyorker)

@

(via newyorker)


Link

May 28, 2014
@ 11:07 am
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113 notes

Don’t let anybody raise you. You’ve been raised. »

lettersofnote:



In 1945, weeks after graduating from high school and with no support from the child’s father, 17-year-old Maya Angelou gave birth to her only son. Two months later, desperate for independence, she moved out of her mother’s home, found accommodation of her own, and began to raise her son….

A woman who had such a way with words. RIP Maya.


Photo

Apr 26, 2014
@ 8:00 pm
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650 notes

scissorsandthread:

Tody Bird No. 5 | Pratt Creek Art

scissorsandthread:

Tody Bird No. 5 | Pratt Creek Art


Quote

Apr 26, 2014
@ 4:00 pm
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8,737 notes

I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature. My attachments are always excessively strong.

Jane Austen (via daianayumi)

(Source: catchabody-intherye, via halfblack--learningwhitelies)